Wednesday, September 21, 2011

I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech, and a hell of an .... Management Major? Academic Rigors for Black Football Players at Georgia Tech

Future Engineers? Not so much.

 "The South stands at Armageddon," brayed Georgia Governor Marvin Griffin to the regents. "The battle is joined. We cannot make the slightest concession to the enemy in this dark and lamentable hour of struggle. There is no more difference in compromising the integrity of race on the playing field than in doing so in the classrooms. One break in the dike and the relentless seas will rush in and destroy us."

Never forget this quote when you consider the extraordinary lengths that the schools discussed in this article have gone to in accommodating Black athlete-students (and in trying to add Black undergraduates) to the two biggest schools in Georgia.
 
When the University of Georgia and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) meet on the football field this November for the annual "good, clean old fashioned hate" grudge match, a most curious scene will unfold. UGA sports a team of more than 75 percent Black players, the vast majority of whom rely on "special admit"- in 1999-2000, 94 percent of the football team were 'special admits' compared to only seven percent of the general student body -  status to gain admission to the university. Once there, most of these Black athletes are 'clustered' in the Housing major, the easiest academic path at UGA. 

The Atlantic Monthly recently lamented the shame of college football for taking advantage of underprivileged Black athletes; in reality, it is only athletic ability that grants acceptance and a lowering of academic standards to Black athletes whose intellectual abilities are lacking and would forever keep them from being granted admission to a school like UGA or Georgia Tech. Both schools bend over backwards trying to attract and accommodate Black undergraduates, but maintaining high academic standards for admission precludes such Utopian hopes from coming to fruition.

Competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and trying to maintain its status as one of the top public institutions for higher learning in the country, Georgia Tech has gone much farther than UGA in accommodating Black football players at the school and integrating their academic deficiencies into the curriculum of the institution. In the bad old days of segregation, Georgia Tech fielded all-white football teams (up until 1970) and won plenty of games, national acclaim and championships.

Many of these white student-athletes would go on to earn degrees in electrical, chemical, industrial, mechanical, and other assorted engineering disciplines. But with integration of college football in the South came the belief that only recruiting Black athletes could bring fame, fortune, and glory to the school. Remember, the top recruiting guru Tom Lemming has admitted massive discrimination goes on against white running backs, defensive backs, receivers and other skilled position players, all because college coaches have been conditioned to believe Black athletes are bigger, stronger, and faster.

Georgia Tech's current coach, Paul Johnson, does not recruit white skilled position players on offense. He didn't do this at Naval Academy, nor did he do this at Georgia Southern. He plays Black players at the quarterback, fullback, and hybrid tailback/running back positions in his famed "triple option" attack. Funny, the school plays at Bobby Dodd Stadium, named for a football coach that famously retired so that he didn't have to recruit Black football players.

Sports Illustrated published this story on Bobby Dodd and his Georgia Tech football team back in 1957, detailing a football that was all-white, and student-athletes who were actually sold on going to Tech to earn an engineering degree:
The "kids" are one of the real anomalies in big-time college football. Because of Tech's high academic standards their football players must be scholars in fact as well as name. This keeps many of the beefy tackle types away from Tech and has forced Dodd to replace size with speed. Yet Dodd makes his system work in one of the toughest conferences in the country—the Southeastern.

"Some schools go all over the country to get players. Here at Tech, we try to get the local boy. I believe if you have local boys you will have a better team. Me, for instance, I can talk to a boy from this area in my language and he'll understand me. We have something in common. A kid from up North—well, it's just not the same. I can take a boy from the Southeast and fire him up so he'll play 110% of what he's capable. Now I don't know why it should be that way, but it is.

"Another funny thing. Generally, a southern boy hasn't got the physical size that kids from Pennsylvania or Texas or the Midwest have. But they've got this unbelievable spirit and willingness. I think you get a bunch together from the same region and they're going to play better together because they have this common background—a common understanding—that makes for better teamwork. Anyhow, we try to get the local boy.

"We rely on Tech's scholastic and football records as the persuader. And, of course, public relations. A coach, he's got to be a public relations man, a salesman. You have a product to sell—in this case, Georgia Tech—and you go out and sell it the best way you know how. Technical education is a big help. We turn out engineers. Everyone wants to hire engineers. The kids, they get jobs a year before they get out of school and they make good money. And you've got to realize that our football tradition helps, too. We've been in six bowls the last six years. Won every one of them. Been in eight bowls since I became head coach 12 years ago. I think kids like a winner."
 Watching Georgia Tech play football now, you get a weird feeling that none of these kids belong at an academically strenuous like the Tech. The crowd is almost all-white (the student body and alumni being overwhelmingly white, though foreign students from India and China spend their Saturday's in the school library studying). Yet a team of predominately Black athlete-students representing one of the most respected engineering institutions on the football field? What would Dodd think?

How many of these Black athletes even major in engineering? The answer might shock you:
When Jay Finch arrived at Georgia Tech, he wasn't just interested in being a lineman for the Yellow Jackets football team. He wanted to study architecture, too.


 Then he talked with some student advisers, who gave him a dose of reality.

"They were like, 'You can expect anywhere from 100 to 120 hours of studio time,'" Finch recalled. "I said, 'Oh, like in a month.' And they were like, 'No, in a week.' And I was like, 'On top of football?'"

With that, Finch hopped aboard the M Train.

At Georgia Tech, where the famous fight song proclaims "I'm a heck of an engineer," nearly 70 percent of the football team (43 of 62 players) has chosen to major in management, a business degree dubbed the "M Train" by those on campus who consider it an easier route to a diploma than the school's renowned engineering program.

But the Yellow Jackets are hardly the only school where players tend to congregate in the same fields of study. There are four others universities where at least half the sophomores, juniors and seniors playing football are pursuing the same degree, The Associated Press found in a survey of the 68 schools in the conferences which receive automatic bids to the Bowl Championship Series, plus Notre Dame and Big East-member-to-be TCU.

At Vanderbilt, it's human and organizational development (35 of 59). At UCLA, history is a big draw (27 of 47). At Wake Forest, there's been a gridiron run on the communications department (34 of 60). At Baylor, upset winners over TCU on the opening weekend of this season, expect to find a lot of big guys in general studies (27 of 53).

This is not mere coincidence, of course. While it's natural for a selected group of students — in this case, male athletes — to be interested in the same classroom subjects, it's also apparent many are drawn to courses that are more accommodating to their Saturday pursuit.

"I wanted to dedicate myself more toward football," conceded Finch, a sophomore center. "Yeah, I did take a little bit of the easier road. Management is still hard. You've still got to go to class.

"But," he added, "at least I'm not up 'til 3 in the morning drawing."

The trend is so prevalent it has its own name — clustering — and extends far beyond Georgia Tech, Vanderbilt, UCLA, Wake Forest and Baylor.

The AP survey, compiled from media guides, university websites and information provided by the schools, showed at least half the football players with declared majors at a dozen other universities are bunched in two fields of study. At 22 schools, 50 percent or more are pursuing a degree from a group of three majors.
That means more than half of the schools at the core of major college football — 39 of 68 teams — have some level of clustering.
Georgia Tech, for instance, receives more requests from the football team than any other for special admissions — enrollment for those who don't meet the standards applied to the overall student body. But officials at the Atlanta school point out management is one of the most rigorous business programs in the country, requiring everyone to take two calculus courses and two lab sciences.

"There's always going to be that tension," said Anderson Smith, the senior vice provost for academic affairs. "You've got to recruit who the best players are. But it's a much more heterogeneous population than what we have applying to Georgia Tech as regular students."

 How does that feel to have a school - renowned for its engineering program - to be represented by Black athlete-students majoring in the easiest, least academically rigorous curriculum? Georgia Tech students, walking around their campus - which is deep in the heart of Black-Run Atlanta - are known to sometimes questions whether a Black person on their campus is a potential robber or mugger, or a Management major.

 While an epidemic of violence against Georgia Tech students is ongoing - the perpetrators have all been Black residents of the Atlanta - with E-mail advisories sent out regularly to coeds warning of muggings, break-ins, car-jacking and other assorted violence on campus - leaving students always cautious when they see a Black face on campus.

It has been stated that the Management degree was created specifically in mind with the well-noted deficiencies that Black people when it comes to mathematics. To field a competitive football and basketball squad, Georgia Tech officials decided to allow Black athletes to circumvent the engineering discipline that brings acclaim, patents and students from all over the world to study there, and create the Management degree. 

According to a New York Times study on the geography of football fans, Atlanta is home to one of the most rabid fan bases in the country. Georgia Tech has the second-largest fan base in the ACC, larger than even UGA. The school has a huge footprint when it comes to its fan base:
Still, the S.E.C.’s average of about 1.1 million fans per team — not counting Texas A&M — sets a slightly lower bar than the Big Ten’s. Clemson (1.8 million fans), Georgia Tech (1.7 million) or Virginia Tech would improve upon it, while Missouri and West Virginia (1.0 million) are aren’t far from the league average and would do more to expand the conference’s geographic footprint.

It should be noted that

ForGeorgia Tech football players had the highest average SAT of any college football back in 2008, but that score - 1028 out of a possible 1600 - was 315 points lower than the average score of their classmates:
  • Football players average 220 points lower on the SAT than their classmates. Men's basketball was 227 points lower.
  • University of Florida won the prize for biggest gap between football players and the student body, with players scoring 346 points lower than their peers.
  • Georgia Tech had the nation's best average SAT score for football players, 1028 of a possible 1600, and best average high school GPA, 3.39 of a possible 4.0. But because its student body is apparently very smart, Tech's football players still scored 315 SAT points lower than their classmates.
For those who argue that Black athletes in collegiate sports should be paid (because they come from an underprivileged background), know this: if these Black students didn't excel at football or basketball, they wouldn't have a pray of getting into the school. As it is - at UGA and Georgia Tech - most of the Black athletes require "special admit" status to get in.

Steve Sailer recently noted that donations to college athletic departments (these are tax-exempt, one of the great scams in America) have continued to grow, even as the economy has faltered. A college football team is the most powerful symbol of the university, a source of pride for alumni to gloat about over cocktails and golf, and way to unite the the campus.

Georgia Tech has one of the top fight songs in college football. It goes:
I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech, and a hell of an engineer—
A helluva, helluva, helluva, helluva, hell of an engineer.
 So the next time you see a Georgia Tech football game on, realize you are watching a team full of Management Majors, the easiest major at the school because the Black athletes on the field lack the mental acumen to earn an engineering degree. And because Paul Johnson is one of the college coaches who has bought into the "only Black athletes on the field give me a shot at winning" mentality. A hell of an engineer? Try a team full of Management majors - the graduation rates for Black players compared to whites is pretty bad - that require "special admit" to the school.

It should be noted that in 2010, Richard Lapchick published his annual College Football Bowl Bound Teams Black-White Graduation Disparity Guide and Georgia Tech had one of the lowest graduation rates for its Black players. This has become a hilarious tradition: each year, despite millions of dollars dedicated to tutoring athletes and keeping them eligible, we find out that the white-Black graduation gap only gets worse. Only 43 percent of Georgia Tech's Black football players graduated, compared to 75 percent of its white players. I guess a Management degree isn't so easy?

Funny to think that in 1956, Georgia Tech (fielding an an all-white team) almost didn't face Pittsburgh in the Sugar Bowl because the school played a Black player. Though they had faced a Notre Dame team in 1953 that had a Black player, this would be the first game after Brown v. Board had passed. Hundreds of Georgia Tech marched on the state capitol, not in support of the Black player from Pittsburgh, but because they didn't want Tech to boycott the Sugar Bowl! Football has - and will always - always played an integral role in the life of southerners, easily being the most popular sport in the region.

14 year later, Georgia Tech would finally integrate (though not before Bobby Dodd retired, always having coached all-white teams) and the first Black player would be Eddie McAshan.

Interestingly, he would be the first Black starting quarterback for a major southern school. Though he set school records (remember, most schools didn't start throwing the ball until the late 70s - 80s), he would throw a lot of interceptions and forever be remembered for the racial turmoil he brought to Atlanta :


McAshan broke into the starting lineup back when blacks were regarded as lacking the intellectual and leadership skills to play quarterback. His sophomore debut at Georgia Tech was hailed as a milestone in Jet and Ebony.

But before the final game of his senior year in 1972, everything exploded under a racially charged cloud that has followed Eddie McAshan along 18 years of detours and dead ends.

During those tense years when Southern college football was still largely segregated, mistakes - even misunderstandings - weren't tolerated. When it came to crossing the color barrier, you could step over the line, but not out of line.

``One of the first things you learned at Georgia Tech is that `Ma Tech' is unforgiving,'' said Karl Barnes, a teammate during the 1971-72 seasons. ``Ma Tech would knock you down, and the strong would get back up and keep going.''

McAshan and Ma Tech kept going, but in opposite directions, an estrangement that has lasted nearly two decades.

The old clippings McAshan had sealed in plastic tell of a shy young man who endured the special stresses of breaking a color barrier and bearing the racial taunts, the slashed tires and the lynchings in effigy.

So when the university denied McAshan's request for extra family tickets to the season-ending game against Georgia in 1972, ``It was what they call the last straw,'' McAshan said recently.

When McAshan skipped a practice to protest the decision, coach Bill Fulcher suspended him from the Georgia game, which Tech lost, then extended the suspension to include the Liberty Bowl against Iowa State.
Atlanta's black community rallied to McAshan's defense; Georgia Tech's athletic department and administration backed Fulcher. McAshan soon became a civil rights cause celebre, receiving advice from black activists who tried to organize a boycott of the Liberty Bowl. His black teammates, fearing the loss of their scholarships, crossed an NAACP picket line outside the Liberty Bowl but wore black armbands in a show of support.

While his backup led Georgia Tech to a 31-30 victory over Iowa State, McAshan sat outside the stadium in a white stretch limousine with Jesse Jackson, who would call him the ``Jackie Robinson of Southern college football.''
 ESPN, which promotes the concept of Black supremacy in athletics 24/7 (and acts as if legitimate sports weren't played until integration), published a hagiography to McAshan here, with these words:
Today, big-time college coaches are escorted onto the field, surrounded by security. Back then, a different kind of security was needed when McAshan came onto the field. They were there to keep him safe from racist fans. During his college career, McAshan's tires were slashed and his dorm room burned in a suspicious fire. As Tech's team bus drove across the Auburn campus at a game, McAshan saw himself hanging from a tree in effigy; and at first, guards at Auburn's stadium refused to allow him to enter the players' entrance because they didn't believe a southern university would have black players.

This story about Auburn is odd, because Auburn was recruiting Black players as early as 1968. In 1970, he first Black player debuted on the team (James Owens).Back then, freshmen were ineligible, so they played on the freshmen teams. McAshan stories are of racism are all dubious; he just wasn't a very good quarterback, basically a Reggie Ball.


Georgia Tech graduates should be embarrassed to be represented on the field by athletes who required "special admit" to garner admission to the school. They should be more embarrassed by the fact that a special major was set-up to help maintain their eligibility.



44 comments:

Anonymous said...

The SAT scoring scale has changed since you and I were in school...when 1600 was the highest score, 1028 would have been considered a good score. This artcile loses steam using the old scale.

From about.com:

So what is a good SAT score? The exam consists of three parts: Critical Reading, Mathematics and Writing. The scores from each section can range from 200 to 800, so the best possible total score is 2400. The average score for each section is roughly 500, so the average total score is about 1500. For the 1.65 million test-takers in the class of 2011, the mean scores were 497 critical reading, 514 math, and 489 reading.

Anonymous said...

Obviously, not the the Georgia Tech of my father's-GT 33. ME. I remember him saying he went out for freshmen football-up to 1:00 AM studying stints put an end to that.

Rev. Dr,. Swift said...

It is appalling how you honkies defile young black athletes by trying to turn them into students. Young brothers don't care about education, they only want to ball! That's what they do. How dare you try to teach them to go against their nature! They are born to ball, be it football, basketball, baseball, and even hockey if they have a mind to.

A shark is born to hunt, we don't teach them to fetch. A cheetah is born to run, we don't teach them to sit. So is a black man born to ball, so quit trying to teach him to do calculus, and make him act all white!

Anonymous said...

I went to Georgia Tech, and it's damned humiliating. This article is humiliating, and I am ashamed to have the degraded state of Tech shoved in my face like this. I am proud to be able to say I haven't given them one red cent. Ever!

Stuff Black People Don't Like said...

This article from Sports Illustrated in 1957 about Bobby Dodd is required reading. Sports can be a positive thing. Once, SEC recruited primarily white kids from the state the school was in: now, they all look for kids who have the right physical attributes.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1132997/index.htm

This is Bobby Dodd telling SI how he recruited back in 1957:

"We rely on Tech's scholastic and football records as the persuader. And, of course, public relations. A coach, he's got to be a public relations man, a salesman. You have a product to sell—in this case, Georgia Tech—and you go out and sell it the best way you know how. Technical education is a big help. We turn out engineers. Everyone wants to hire engineers. The kids, they get jobs a year before they get out of school and they make good money. And you've got to realize that our football tradition helps, too. We've been in six bowls the last six years. Won every one of them. Been in eight bowls since I became head coach 12 years ago. I think kids like a winner."

Now, Georgia Tech has to "cluster" Black players in something called a Management degree.

Fayette White Guy said...

You know I love Tech. I have to give you credit, this piece is very thorough, and I can't really deny any of it. You were very fair, and I give you credit for that.

Damn you for mentioning Reggie Ball. I was hoping to never have to hear that name again.

Thanks again for touching on something so personal to me.

Anonymous said...

Old-line SEC fan here. Georgia Tech has always been athletically ambitious going back over a century. In my childhood, Bobby Dodd's teams were famous in the segregated SEC.

Have you heard about Georgia Tech's first black player, quarterback Eddie McAshan? Do you know the story behind the 1972 Liberty Bowl when McAshan refused to play and Tech won without him?

Do you know why Georgia Tech left the SEC in 1964? It was because of a feud between Bear Bryant, Tech, and the Atlanta newspapers.

Anonymous said...

@SBPDL: So how do you account for the drunken fanatacism of drunken WHITE Bulldog and Tech fans whose lifestyle it is to trek to these Negro-dominated football games every weekend?

Anonymous said...

I attended GT from 1995 to 2000 (Chem E). I was a walk on, red-shirt, DT and wrestled for two seasons. I knew a lot of athletes.

There were stupid white players and stupid black players, but the % of stupid black players was overwhelming (in every sport; especially basketball).

I call attention to Reverend Swift's post; that sums it up. Whether he's joking or not, it's spot on how the black athlete at GT acts. They are a "baller," to a student. Swaying from that image tends to be shunned by other 'special admit' collegiate athletes.

I tutored some students to help pay for school (I also bounced and worked at a grocery store) as to not accrue debt via school loans. Outside the rare example (Calvin Johnson), I mainly tutored black students.

Two factors always sprung up amongst those I tutored; 1) They were just stupid, 2) They were lazy. I witnessed, first hand, these student athletes going to Freaknik (hard to avoid when it's all around campus) and really "black it up." You might say, "but people party in college so what's wrong with that?"

The problem with that is the black students were looking to party but also get back to really acting like niggers. Dialect and syntax is thrown out the window while civil behavior took a nosedive. I was invited to go down Marietta Street with a few players, but I declined. I did get a shirt that said "STR8BALLIN FREAKNIK 95" but never wore it. I never bothered to find out what that meant.

The (mostly black) athletes tutoring program went like this in my day:
Paid for by Alumni
Afforded the actual test beforehand. (Nobody else got this privilege)
Teachers encouraged to give leniency when grading an athlete's test.
Allowed to have a tutor/assistance help them during the test.
Allowed to take the test outside the classroom.
Allowed use of reading materials while taking the test.
Allowed extra time (sometimes unlimited) for test.

This isn't speculative; I actually witnessed this with my own eyes. Those students not afforded such benefits are either nonchalant or rightfully perturbed. I was in the latter category.

Not being a 'star' or scholarship athlete, I received none of those benefits. I still managed to make it through and get my degree (and then my Master's degree).

GT claims to educate to graduation the most 'African American' engineers in the country. I'd be interested to see how many of them are athletes. Why? Because if you're an athlete you're afforded so many luxuries and assistance that you practically just need the mental capability of reading the answers and then writing them down on another page.

CJH

Anonymous said...

@Anon6:25: Your tale is a sad commentary indeed about what our sick society places value upon. Why are these imbecilic morons propped up and exhalted? I JUST DON'T GET IT. Time to move abroad. Maybe it's saner in Australia or New Zealand?

Anonymous said...

"@SBPDL: So how do you account for the drunken fanatacism of drunken WHITE Bulldog and Tech fans whose lifestyle it is to trek to these Negro-dominated football games every weekend?"

Who cares? This blog is not Stuff That Drunken White People Like.

Anonymous said...

"It has been stated that the Management degree was created specifically in mind with the well-noted deficiencies that Black people when it comes to mathematics. To field a competitive football and basketball squad, Georgia Tech officials decided to allow Black athletes to circumvent the engineering discipline that brings acclaim, patents and students from all over the world to study there, and create the Management degree"

Seriously?

From the Georgia Tech Website "The School of Commerce, forerunner to the School of Management, was created in 1913." I believe that was a few years before the first black students were admitted. Besides, somebody has to manage all those engineers in companies.

Interestingly, there is an Economics major offered at Tech. It requires Calculus III.

Anonymous said...

There were 4, what 5 great articles before going back to college football? Paul..we know these schools are debasing themselves hiring ghetto trash to play....one article says it all...no need to keep harping on it..please..not more college FEETSBALL!

Anonymous said...

Sadly you're really takin on a bad direction...

Quote
"They were like, 'You can expect anywhere from 100 to 120 hours of studio time,'" Finch recalled. "I said, 'Oh, like in a month.' And they were like, 'No, in a week.' And I was like, 'On top of football?'"
Endquote

Yeah right... The typical white guy (good athlete,good guy, genius...) can study, let's say 100 hs in a week (24x7=144 hs), beside eating, sleeping, and obviously football (let's hope classes are included)
Give a me break
You steered too much... I liked a lot this site....
It was pinpointing many flaws in what you call BRA
Right now you're just disguising your hate for everything which is not white (in color, attitude, agenda)
So at least don't be hypocrites and change the name of the site... 'cause SBPDL - Stuff Black People Don't Like don't fit anymore
What' about
I hate everyone who's not white but I can directly say it so I'm pretending to do it in a nice way

Fayette White Guy said...

Yeah I'm not sure about the claim Management was created for black athletes. I know many legitimate white Management majors at GT. The Management program is actually highly-ranked.

eh said...

Also, virtually all of the eligibility, NCAA infraction, and criminality cases among college athletes (e.g. the recent Ohio State mess that ultimately led to the resignation of the head coach) in the recent past have been due to black "student athletes". Of course the media never report it as such.

Anonymous said...

ESPN, which promotes the concept of Black supremacy in athletics 24/7 (and acts as if legitimate sports weren't played until integration), published a hagiography to McAshan here, with these words:
Today, big-time college coaches are escorted onto the field, surrounded by security. Back then, a different kind of security was needed when McAshan came onto the field. They were there to keep him safe from racist fans. During his college career, McAshan's tires were slashed and his dorm room burned in a suspicious fire. As Tech's team bus drove across the Auburn campus at a game, McAshan saw himself hanging from a tree in effigy; and at first, guards at Auburn's stadium refused to allow him to enter the players' entrance because they didn't believe a southern university would have black players.


Remember that if you have the mouse mans channel on a package. It is level with CNN for its competence.

Old School Youth said...

Truly unfortunate what is happening to the revenue sports of college athletics.

Anonymous said...

"Sadly you're really takin on a bad direction..."

The quote that has your panties in a twist was taken directly from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution...

http://www.ajc.com/sports/ap-enterprise-examining-football-1158812.html

If it bothers you so much, then contact the AJC and express that they are just disguising their "hate for everything which is not white".

And if you don't, then you're a fucking phony.

Wrecked said...

I'm having to break this into two comments.

First off there are 168 hours in a week. And 100+ hours of studio time for Architecture majors is the real deal.

I must admit I was part of this, to an extent. As a graduate student I TAed and later was a full instructor for math courses, predominantly non-calculus based courses that were required for non-engineering degrees.

I'll say that the majority of the Tech team does not belong at Tech, at all - even considering the lowered standards of the Management major. They are there to play football, not go to class, and when they did deign to appear they brought that attitude with them.

I would like to exclude a very small number of football players by name. I can think of two that I taught that were truly decent and hard-working and a few others who were not a headache. I don't want to make myself so readily identifiable though.

Just a random assortment of things I saw:

- Players caught repeatedly cheating with no disciplinary action. I once took a test away from a cheating player to keep as evidence . . . and was told that since he hadn't copied anything yet it wasn't cheating. When I offered to show them the identical wrong answers on his paper from the previous two tests, copied from the same person in all three cases (a basketball player I might add), I was told those were not evidence because I didn't take up the papers immediately as evidence of cheating. Catch-22. This was resolved in 5 business HOURS, as opposed to taking 10 business days or more in the case of a normal student.

Wrecked said...

- Talking to other TAs the opinion was uniform - the athletes cheat and no charges are taken seriously, so why stick out your head? If there is an opposite to the valuable football player it is the expendable grad student and we all knew where we stood.

- As a graduate instructor I had responsibility for my class and it's grading, but was under loose supervision from the Math Department. My tests were subject to pre-approval and generally regarded as too difficult, so I ended up dumbing down the course considerably. It was difficult to curve the course much to help the athletes pass since many of the "normal" Management majors finished the semester with 90+ averages, a rarity at Tech which has not suffered grade inflation like most schools.

- Football players in some classes were assigned checkers to go around to make sure they were in class that day. The players knew the exact time, so they'd roll in 25 minutes late en masse, sit in the back row, wait to be counted, and then roll out with another 25 minutes of class left unheard afterwards.

- A trio of players had been doing decently, even with my easy tests. They did quite poorly on one test, and hadn't finished the homework assignment like they normally did. I asked them what was wrong. They said "our tutor didn't finish that homework for us so we didn't know what was on the test. But don't worry, we talked to somebody and we're gonna get him fired." I was floored.

- Anecdote from a French class - one player was unresponsive and refused to speak in class or participate at all. When the teacher tried to coax him into saying one phrase in French he said "no, that's nasty, it sound like you spittin, that's nasty." The teacher let him be the rest of the semester.

- I once sat down with a female "student-athlete" who was a senior. She was having trouble with a particular problem for which she did not know how to employ her calculator. I realized it came down to her being unable to solve for "x" in the equation "2x=1". Not wanting to give her the exact answer I led her through the solution of "3x=1" and had her tease out the elusive solution, which took her 5 minutes of guessing and checking because she was completely devoid of any knowledge of algebra. Armed with the answer of "x=1/3" she then proved completely unable to unravel the analogous solution of the original stumbling block. Her admission to Georgia Tech and her graduation with a Georgia Tech degree make a complete mockery of all the other fine work that goes on in this place.

Anonymous said...

"please..not more college FEETSBALL!"

I'm starting to think this is Desiree.

No white person could possibly be this fucking stupid.

Anonymous said...

The deadliest proof would be to find a study which shows how the vast majority of black football players who by whatever means acquire degrees from these stellar universities fare in the real world. As one who used this test to evaluate the effectiveness of a special needs school, I hypothesize the results would be telling, that they fade quickly back into the socioeconomic curve of their black non-college brethren.

I generally enjoy what you write and am amazed by the volume you produce, but you've pretty well pounded the black college football player story into mush.

Anonymous said...

"Sports can be a positive thing. Once, SEC recruited primarily white kids from the state the school was in: now, they all look for kids who have the right physical attributes."

Unless of course you are white, then having the right physical attributes doesn't matter at schools like GT, the whole SEC, most of the ACC and a lot of PAC-12 and Big Ten teams.

Many times people miss the fact that black athletes that don't have good physical attributes get athletic scholarships, while whites with superior attributes get ignored, like Patriots running back Danny Woodhead who didn't get a single D1 look, ended up playing for D2 Chadron State in Nebraska and set the all-time NCAA rushing record. Meanwhile plenty of black RBs didn't do squat in D1, but still got 5 years of full scholarships. Find out more at www.castefootball.us

Anonymous said...

You guys act like special treatment for athletes is something new. Guess what, it's not. And last I checked management is a legitimate field of study.

Anonymous said...

"You guys act like special treatment for athletes is something new."

Special treatment??

No, we're not talking about "special treatment".

We're talking about admitting borderline retards into institutions of higher learning, then pretending that said retards are receiving an education, even though virtually none will actually graduate, or leave school with any marketable skills (other than their pre-existing athletic ability).

Dartmouth for Free Byatches. said...

Though above the average of 1000 (which is what scores were weighted, medianed, at on the 1600 pt. scale) a score of 1028 would have been mediocre. I graduated in 2004 with 1310 on the old scale whereas my younger brother graduated in 2006 using the SAT on the new 2400 pt. scale.

It changed sometime in either 2005 or 2006. Still, most colleges accept just Math and Reading scores making something out of 1600 sort of an ambiguous number. I think the writing portion is still in the "testing" phase meaning that they have years to go to weight some kind of median for the whole country.

I'll tell you this: I sure got into every school I applied to despite checking off the boxes for White and for Male. I'll also admit this: I'm sure their wanting some guaranteed GI Bill money was a factor in their decision making process too.

Anonymous said...

I see nothing wrong with a management degree. Every college from Harvard to Stanford to community colleges have management degrees. I'm surprised GT didn't create an Afro-studies degree program for their feetbawl playas and other afleets

Zenster said...

I've said it before and I'll say it again.

Pass a bill requiring schools to field teams that proportionally reflect the racial balance of their respective student bodies.

End of problem. This could sail through disguised as an "anti-discrimination" law.

Anonymous said...

My goodness. So many inaccuracies, but I have mention a couple here:

"[Georgia Tech graduates] should be more embarrassed by the fact that a special major was set-up to help maintain their eligibility." I am old enough to have been in school when Eddie McAshan played. Even then, most football players were management majors. More people graduate with a management degree than any other single degree at Ga. Tech.

The stuff that happened 40, 50, 60 years ago is interesting historically speaking (Bobby Dodd retired after the 1966 season). However, I'm surprised you did not mention that Ga. Tech's engineering school today admits and graduates more black engineers than any other engineering school in the country. The new Dean of the engineering school, Gary May, also happens to be black.

Sheesh.

Stuff Black People Don't Like said...

Any school that brags about having "the most Black engineers" graduate is one that should be avoided. Have you ever heard a school brag about having the most "white engineer" graduates?

Talk about confirming Black-Run America in Academia.

here is the Black Alumni Association Web site for Tech:

http://www.development.gatech.edu/assets/GTBAOcasestatement.pdf

here is something even better. The racial breakdown by major at Georgia Tech.

http://factbook.gatech.edu/content/undergraduate-enrollment-collegeethnicitygender

Notice that the "College of Management" does not grant the most degrees.

There's some fun data to extrapolate from that Web site, I just don't have the time. However, I have a lot of friends who went to Tech and one told me that the official manner in which students are evaluated goes like this (which racial member, by sex) get the highest priority for enrollment.

1. Black Females
2. Black Males
3. Asians
4. white Females
5. white males

I'd love to see an SAT breakdown for these "Black" engineers, most of which come from the highest portion of the Bell Curve in Africa (and are not Black Americans).

Anonymous said...

"Ga. Tech's engineering school today admits and graduates more black engineers than any other engineering school in the country."

If I was 18 and considering enrolling at GT, this would be a deterrent.

Zenster said...

Stuff Black People Don't Like: Any school that brags about having "the most Black engineers" graduate is one that should be avoided. Have you ever heard a school brag about having the most "white engineer" graduates?

Touché.

Your words evoke the justified criticism of Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor talking about how "I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would, more often than not, reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life".

Let's just do a quick switch of a few words:

"I would hope that a wise White man with the richness of his experiences would, more often than not, reach a better conclusion than a Latina woman who hasn't lived that life"

You can hear the shrieks of "waycism" all the way to Bangor, Maine. Justice is supposed to be colorblind, as should be university admissions. Bravo, Mr. Kersey.

Anonymous said...

There's some fun data to extrapolate from that Web site, I just don't have the time. However, I have a lot of friends who went to Tech and one told me that the official manner in which students are evaluated goes like this (which racial member, by sex) get the highest priority for enrollment.

1. Black Females
2. Black Males
3. Asians
4. white Females
5. white males


I doubt Asians get preference at any top college. The studies have shown that they usually need higher scores than whites due to their overrepresentation at the top schools

Discard said...

Anon at 8:56 AM: I think Orientals as a rule don't do as well as Whites with admission essays or similar writing hurdles. Therefore they need higher test scores to compensate. Also, Chinese have been setting the standard in recent years for cheating and gaming the testing systems, so I'd guess that some admissions administrators take that into account.

Anonymous said...

Also, Chinese have been setting the standard in recent years for cheating and gaming the testing systems, so I'd guess that some admissions administrators take that into account.

I'm sure whites never cheat. What do you think all these SAT prep sites do? They get questions from the SAT tests and give it to the students. The numbers change a bit, but the questions are still the same. Boy, you guys are stupid and bitter. You sound like a bunch of blacks making excuses.

Discard said...

Anon at 10:13 PM: Nobody said that Whites don't cheat, only that Chinese have been setting the standard in recent years. It's their culture, you know. They can see no reason not to get over on the Long Noses. They go far beyond SAT prep sites, which, BTW, are not cheating. Living in Southern California, you can see the extraordinary precautions needed for any academic or civil service test, all to keep the Chinese tricksters honest. It's all very common knowledge among academics. Even the multi-culturalists admit it. They don't like to be scammed either.

Anonymous said...

The management school is top 25 in the nation, so it is nothing to sneeze at, and is only getting better

Anonymous said...

Of all the schools that you wanted to criticize, you choose Tech? Really?

Anonymous said...

This one of the most ignorant, uninformed, and in many cases patently false pieces I have ever read on the internet. Absolutely ridiculous.

Anonymous said...

How misguiding. The Business Administration program at Georgia Tech is consistently ranked in the top 50 and has been climbing the charts for years. It has been ahead of UGA for several years (suck it, Terry). Among recruiters, Business students are at the top of their lists. The College has an extremely high post-graduation salary, and the 2nd highest percentage of students who have accepted jobs by graduation (ahead of ALL engineering programs). Many of the Institute's most prominent and successful alumni were Management majors, and the College has, hands-down, the most generous alumni (heard of the latest record-breaking donation from Management alum, perhaps?). The College attracts professors away from Wharton, the London School of Economics, and MIT. The MBA program is even higher ranked than the undergraduate program, and the Executive Education program is renowned for its success in the community. The College also does NOT have the highest GPA (which some may view as a measure of difficulty). The only difference between the Business program and any other program is that Professors actually care that you learn the material during the entire semester, rather than just fail everyone and put a curve in place at the end.

In conclusion, please cut off your dick and feed it to a pack of wild dogs, you ignorant slut.

Stuff Black People Don't Like said...

Why is it false? The only reason Black males are at Tech is because of the belief they are needed to win football games.

Stuff Black People Don't Like said...

The school would be even higher rated if it weren't dragged down by Black football players.

Anonymous said...

I am a current BLACK FEMALE here at Georgia Tech, and I would like to address some of the terrible things that I have read in this article. While I do agree that the majority of the major sports teams are black, and that many of them would not have gotten here without a sports scholarship, lumping all black students together and saying that seeing a black face their campus has the white students concerned is simply ignorant. Yes, there are very few of us on campus compared to the thousands of white, Asian, and Indian majority, however, we are a very proud and hardworking group that strive every day to beat the negative stigma placed upon us by ignorant racists that cannot stand to think that the "niggers" that they treated worse than dogs fifty years ago could possibly rise above them and be comparable to them in society. If you actually look at the statistics for the non-athletic Black student body compared to the average, you would find that our average GPAs have risen above the Georgia Tech average, and are consistently rising.

It is extremely insulting to me to think that all the hard work that I have put in to making myself a successful student is not even considered by many of the prejudiced people that will blindly criticize me. My accomplishments, and the accomplishments of the majority of the Black community at Georgia Tech, rival and many times beat the accomplishments of our majority counterparts, but since we are minorities, we still are viewed as inferior simply because of the color of our skin.

But as disgusted as I am about this article and the opinions contained in it, I find comfort and even joy in knowing that after it all, I will stand and receive the same Georgia Tech ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING degree as my white classmates, getting job offers with some of the highest starting salaries along with my fellow white classmates, and being in the same or better positions of leadership as my fellow white classmates.

In the meantime, articles like this one are simply fueling the fire. You don't like what you are seeing concerning Black students becoming more prevalent at prestigious, historically white schools? Well you had better brace yourselves, because we will only keep advancing from here. We refuse to conform to the stereotypes put upon us. We will ultimately rise above.